Build an iPerf3 Server on Ubuntu Server 14.04

iperf

iPerf3 is an awesome piece of software and a must for anyone that works in networking, wants to know if they’re getting the right wired/wireless speeds at home (if you ended up creating a 10Gb point-to-point connection from my blog post 10Gb in your homelab for under $70? then you’ll definitely want to test it with this), or wants to know why their Netflix streams look like crap. iPerf3 works off of a client/server model where you install it on one machine to run it in server mode, then install it on another machine to act as the client that connects to the server.

I run a lot of VMs in my homelab and got tired of remembering which ones had iPerf3 installed, so I figured I’d install it on a dedicated VM and make sure it’s always running in server mode. Here’s how I did it on a fresh install of Ubuntu Server 14.04.  Continue reading “Build an iPerf3 Server on Ubuntu Server 14.04”

Build an iPerf3 Server on Ubuntu Server 14.04

Cisco Networking 101: The Comic

Cisco_logo

I was over visiting a good friend of mine last week that teaches Cisco networking classes at our local community college (where I was actually a former student of his). In between discussions of VSANs, Docker, and the Seahawks, he showed me this pretty cool little comic he made that introduces the basic fundamental commands for every student getting started in their CCNA studies.  Continue reading “Cisco Networking 101: The Comic”

Cisco Networking 101: The Comic

Install UniFi on Ubuntu Server 14.04

UniFiLogo

If you ever ask for suggestions on cheap but awesome networking hardware, there’s one company you’ll probably see mentioned the most: Ubiquiti. I started using them experimentally at my last job as a Network Administrator and I fell in love with them so much that I bought an EdgeRouter Lite and an Ubiquiti AP-LR for my homelab. Not only are their devices low priced, but the fact that you can download and use the UniFi software controller completely for free makes them an absolute steal. You can control all of their devices (in the UniFi product line) with this controller that can be installed on Windows, Mac, or Linux.

You can install UniFi on your Windows or Mac workstation, but why when you can just throw up a tiny Linux VM dedicated for it that doesn’t cost a damn thing? Since I’ve been focusing my Linux tutorials on CentOS, I thought I’d switch it up and show you how to install UniFi on Ubuntu Server 14.04 (this will also be assuming that you have an Ubuntu Server VM ready to go).  Continue reading “Install UniFi on Ubuntu Server 14.04”

Install UniFi on Ubuntu Server 14.04

How to install the vSphere HTML5 Web Client Fling

FLINGS

I mentioned in my first how-to blog post that if there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that VMWare’s Flash-based vSphere Web Client sucks. It’s clunky, slow, and I’ve never talked to an administrator that honestly prefers the web client over the standard C# client. If you’re like me, you use the standard client for everything except for the times when you absolutely need to use specific features that are only in the web client.

Well, an awesome new fling just recently came out that I’m sure will make a lot of you happy. The vSphere HTML5 Web Client has just been released and let me tell you that it is awesome. If you’re familiar with the ESXi Embedded Host Client (which is now built into the latest ESXi release) you know that it’s quick, seamless, and makes you wish the vSphere Web Client was the same. Although the HTML5 web client can’t be used as a full replacement for the web client (yet), it still comes with a nice set of initial features that’ll definitely give you a taste of what’s coming soon.  Continue reading “How to install the vSphere HTML5 Web Client Fling”

How to install the vSphere HTML5 Web Client Fling

Get rid of the Windows 10 upgrade icon in your domain

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Coincidentally, the day after I was just praising Microsoft for bringing SQL Server to Linux to both people that might care on my Facebook, they go and push a “security patch” for Internet Explorer that confused a lot of admins (myself included) this morning. This patch pushed the infamous Windows 10 upgrade notification on a lot of Windows 7 domain joined computers. When I started seeing several computers popping up the upgrade icon, I went to /r/sysadmin on Reddit, and sure enough the top post was already a self post about an admin experiencing the outcome of this “patch”. Go ahead and Google “Windows 10 upgrade domain” and filter it to show the last 24 hours, you’ll already see quite a few people complaining and confused. Continue reading “Get rid of the Windows 10 upgrade icon in your domain”

Get rid of the Windows 10 upgrade icon in your domain

Install OpenVPN on CentOS 7 (and why you should be using it)

openvpnlogo

“Why the Hell would I ever want to VPN into my home network? It’s my freakin’ home network.”

Do you ever use public wifi? Have important files at home that you always want access to? Movies/music/TV shows you’d want to watch or listen to from anywhere? Security cameras? Travel to other countries that might block certain traffic? Does your work have an Internet filter or you don’t want them to know you actually just surf Reddit all day? (If my boss is reading this, I swear I don’t do the last one)

There’s a TON of reasons why having VPN access to your home network is not only awesome, but necessary if you ever want to use any public wifi securely. With packet analyzers being widely available and free (even as phone apps or as browser add-ons), hacking software being easier to use, and identity theft constantly being on the rise, it’s definitely important you make sure your information is as safe as possible. This tutorial will show you how to easily install OpenVPN on CentOS 7 and connect to it over the Internet so you can be happy knowing all of your traffic is encrypted and safe. Continue reading “Install OpenVPN on CentOS 7 (and why you should be using it)”

Install OpenVPN on CentOS 7 (and why you should be using it)

Install Guacamole on CentOS 7 & 6 (the super easy way)

guacicon

If you haven’t checked out Guacamole, you seriously need to, but if you’ve been homelabbing for awhile then you’ve probably at least heard of it. Guacamole is an open-source HTML5-based clientless remote desktop gateway, allowing you to remotely connect to your devices via a simple webpage. It works with RDP, SSH, Telnet (but please use SSH instead if you can, guys), and VNC, and it is one of my absolute favorite tools.

I will admit that it’s not uncommon for me to create a new Linux server VM, install something pretty cool, say “This is pretty cool!”, and then never use that VM ever again. But Guacamole is the one that I show off to everyone because of how convenient it is and how well it works. Even if who I’m showing it off to isn’t into homelabs, system administration, or Linux, they always seem to think Guacamole is great. But the one thing that stops a lot of people from using it is the install process (though you can now easily deploy it in Docker). Continue reading “Install Guacamole on CentOS 7 & 6 (the super easy way)”

Install Guacamole on CentOS 7 & 6 (the super easy way)